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Portrait of Heiner Linke; Photo: Kennet Ruona

Heiner Linke

Professor, Deputy dean at Faculty of Engineering, LTH

Portrait of Heiner Linke; Photo: Kennet Ruona

Molecular Motor Transport through Hollow Nanowires

Author

  • Mercy Lard
  • Lasse ten Siethoff
  • Johanna Generosi
  • Alf Mansson
  • Heiner Linke

Summary, in English

Biomolecular motors offer self-propelled, directed transport in designed microscale networks and can potentially replace pump-driven nanofluidics. However, in existing systems, transportation is limited to the two-dimensional plane. Here we demonstrate fully one-dimensional (1D) myosin-driven motion of fluorescent probes (actin filaments) through 80 nm wide, Al2O3 hollow nanowires of micrometer length. The motor-driven transport is orders of magnitude faster than would be possible by passive diffusion. The system represents a necessary element for advanced devices based on gliding assays, for example, in lab-on-a-chip systems with channel crossings and in pumpless nanosyringes. It may also serve as a scaffold for bottom-up assembly of muscle proteins into actin ordered contractile units, mimicking the muscle sarcomere.

Department/s

  • Solid State Physics
  • NanoLund

Publishing year

2014

Language

English

Pages

3041-3046

Publication/Series

Nano Letters

Volume

14

Issue

6

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

The American Chemical Society (ACS)

Topic

  • Nano Technology

Keywords

  • Hollow nanowires
  • actin
  • myosin
  • molecular motors
  • motor proteins
  • 1D
  • gliding assay

Status

Published

Research group

  • Nanometer structure consortium (nmC)

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1530-6992