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Portrait of Heiner Linke; Photo: Kennet Ruona

Heiner Linke

Professor, Deputy dean at Faculty of Engineering, LTH

Portrait of Heiner Linke; Photo: Kennet Ruona

Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks.

Author

  • Dan V Nicolau
  • Mercy Lard
  • Till Korten
  • Falco C M J M van Delft
  • Malin Persson
  • Elina Bengtsson
  • Alf Månsson
  • Stefan Diez
  • Heiner Linke
  • Dan V Nicolau

Summary, in English

The combinatorial nature of many important mathematical problems, including nondeterministic-polynomial-time (NP)-complete problems, places a severe limitation on the problem size that can be solved with conventional, sequentially operating electronic computers. There have been significant efforts in conceiving parallel-computation approaches in the past, for example: DNA computation, quantum computation, and microfluidics-based computation. However, these approaches have not proven, so far, to be scalable and practical from a fabrication and operational perspective. Here, we report the foundations of an alternative parallel-computation system in which a given combinatorial problem is encoded into a graphical, modular network that is embedded in a nanofabricated planar device. Exploring the network in a parallel fashion using a large number of independent, molecular-motor-propelled agents then solves the mathematical problem. This approach uses orders of magnitude less energy than conventional computers, thus addressing issues related to power consumption and heat dissipation. We provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of such a device by solving, in a parallel fashion, the small instance {2, 5, 9} of the subset sum problem, which is a benchmark NP-complete problem. Finally, we discuss the technical advances necessary to make our system scalable with presently available technology.

Department/s

  • NanoLund
  • Solid State Physics

Publishing year

2016-02-22

Language

English

Pages

2591-2596

Publication/Series

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Volume

113

Issue

10

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

National Acad Sciences

Topic

  • Computer Engineering

Status

Published

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1091-6490