Your browser has javascript turned off or blocked. This will lead to some parts of our website to not work properly or at all. Turn on javascript for best performance.

The browser you are using is not supported by this website. All versions of Internet Explorer are no longer supported, either by us or Microsoft (read more here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365/windows/end-of-ie-support).

Please use a modern browser to fully experience our website, such as the newest versions of Edge, Chrome, Firefox or Safari etc.

Portrait of Jonas Tegenfeldt. Photo: Kennet Ruona

Jonas Tegenfeldt

Professor, Coordinator Nanobiology & Neuronanoscience

Portrait of Jonas Tegenfeldt. Photo: Kennet Ruona

Separation of parasites from human blood using deterministic lateral displacement.

Author

  • Stefan Holm
  • Jason Beech
  • Michael P Barrett
  • Jonas Tegenfeldt

Summary, in English

We present the use of a simple microfluidic technique to separate living parasites from human blood. Parasitic trypanosomatids cause a range of human and animal diseases. African trypanosomes, responsible for human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), live free in the blood and other tissue fluids. Diagnosis relies on detection and due to their often low numbers against an overwhelming background of predominantly red blood cells it is crucial to separate the parasites from the blood. By modifying the method of deterministic lateral displacement, confining parasites and red blood cells in channels of optimized depth which accentuates morphological differences, we were able to achieve separation thus offering a potential route to diagnostics.

Department/s

  • Solid State Physics
  • NanoLund

Publishing year

2011

Language

English

Pages

1326-1332

Publication/Series

Lab on a Chip

Volume

11

Issue

Online February 2011

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Royal Society of Chemistry

Topic

  • Condensed Matter Physics

Status

Published

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1473-0189