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Knut Deppert

Knut Deppert

Professor

Knut Deppert

Metallic nanocrystals via an aerosol route

Author

  • Knut Deppert

Summary, in English

Mass production of nanocrystals with accurate size control is a central problem in nanotechnology. Aerosol technology offers the possibility to produce nanocrystals with well-controlled composition and size distribution.An aerosol is defined as solid or liquid particles suspended in a gas, and aerosol science and technology has been used since over 60 years, primarily to study the size, shape and composition of airborne particles [1]. For this purpose, tools have been developed, which allow scientists to fabricate and precisely classify particles in the micro- and nanometer size ranges according to size, and to measure their concentration in the carrier gas [2]. The aerodynamic properties of nanoparticles depend almost exclusively on their size and shape and only to a small extent on their mass and composition, which means that the same generic characterization and production tools can be applied to a variety of different materials [3].Here, I will present a setup of aerosol tools and methods that can be used to generate well-defined metallic nanocrystals.References[1] W.C. Hinds, Aerosol Technology: Properties, Behavior, and Measurement of Airborne Particles, John Wiley & Sons, 2007.[2] R.C. Flagan, Aerosol Sci. Techn., 28, 301-380, 1998.[3] P. Kulkarni, P.A. Baron, and K. Willeke (Eds.), Aerosol Measurement: Principles, Techniques, and Applications, John Wiley & Sons, 2011.Acknowledgments: This work was performed in NanoLund at Lund University and the author would like to thank all aerosol colleagues from Lund for their support.

Department/s

  • NanoLund
  • Solid State Physics

Publishing year

2019-03-17

Language

Swedish

Document type

Conference paper: abstract

Topic

  • Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
  • Chemical Process Engineering

Conference name

3rd German Polish Conference on Crystal Growth

Conference date

2019-03-17 - 2019-03-21

Conference place

Poznan, Poland

Status

Published