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A national agenda for semiconductors is now proposed

Collage of a micro chip and a map of Europe.

In order to strengthen Swedish competitiveness, Lund University is taking the initiative to launch a national effort to mobilize expertise in the semiconductor field – and a proposal for a strategy for semiconductor technology in Sweden has now been proposed during a discussion meeting hosted by Lund University.
“In a nationally shared agenda, Lund has the opportunity to share its collective expertise in semiconductor technology, says Lars-Erik Wernersson,” Professor of Nanoelectronics at LTH and one of the people driving the national collaboration.

Lars-Erik Wernersson is Professor of Nanoelectronics at LTH, Lund University, a PI at NanoLund, and one of the driving forces behind the national collaboration. He says:

“In a nationally shared agenda, Lund has the opportunity to share its collective expertise in semiconductor technology. This cutting-edge knowledge is important to identify in order to serve our national needs, but also to offer unique expertise to the whole of Europe within the Chips Act.”

This cutting-edge knowledge is important to identify in order to serve our national needs, but also to offer unique expertise to the whole of Europe.

The discussion meeting was attended by the Ministry of Enterprise and Innovation through State Secretary Sara Modig and Departmental Secretary Magnus Rentzhog, together with stakeholders from industry, academia, research institutes and funders.

The background to the meeting is a multi-step process. One of the first steps was Lund University’s panel discussion in Almedalen 2022 on how access to semiconductor technology can be secured. The panel discussion made it clear that a national effort and coordination is the necessary way forward for a competitive Swedish industry today and in the future.

Further steps have been taken during the autumn when several roundtable discussions with stakeholders from industry, institutes, financiers, and academia took place – discussions that have formed the basis for the first draft of a national agenda for semiconductor technology.